Dear Prudence

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The clouds will be a daisy chain/ so let me see you smile again — The Beatles

San Diego, California. On August 15, I received a text. “I was hoping to read some blogging on the van. Too much, too soon?”

“Yes,” I replied.

The text was from my mom (and it actually read ‘on the fan’ because she’s constantly battling her phone’s autocorrect, often to great comedic effect) a few days after I spent my first day in the garage with Norman, more than seven months after parking the van in her garage.

That was not the plan.

The plan was to promptly and enthusiastically work to get Norman back on the road, and instead I settled into the worst depression I’ve ever known.

What happened? There’s no simple answer. My family has an extensive history of mental illness, and I’ve experienced depression and anxiety since I hit double digits. I saw a therapist for the first time at age 12, and I’ve been learning how to manage that aspect of my health ever since. It will never not be part of me, and accepting this doesn’t mean I don’t resent it.

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The beginning of this year my beloved cat of nearly 22 years died, and maybe this triggered some sort of existential crisis. Maybe I cracked under the (self-created) pressure I felt to not fuck this (the van, LIFE) up. Whatever it was, I spent six months in the darkest place I’ve ever been. I felt broken. My brain had gone soft and slow. Holding a conversation was tedious and frustrating: I couldn’t concentrate and worse yet I didn’t think I had anything remotely valuable to say to anyone or contribute to the world. The most mundane tasks were suddenly towering obstacles.

In the thick of this sludge I was presented with a very thoughtful gift from my friend Chris, who helped with the motorcycle and was excited for my next project. His wife delivered it to me in April when I cut her hair. It was an ornament of a Volkswagen bus, inscribed with the phrase “Believe you can and you’re halfway there.” I nearly burst into tears when I saw it, because it was so horribly true. I didn’t believe I could do much of anything, much less tackle this completely new endeavor which seemed nothing short of impossible. I was convinced I didn’t deserve the van, that I had somehow conned my family into letting me take it and had failed before I’d even begun. I couldn’t take the ornament home with me. I didn’t feel I deserved it, either.

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At the end of June, desperate for a change of scenery, I traveled to Cuba with friends and felt good for the first time in such a long time. I cried the afternoon we left Havana because I was afraid my mood wouldn’t make the trip back home. Before I could really find out I pulled my back, and it was a full month before it stopped spasming whenever I moved.

As my back finally began improving my mom started asking about the van. She had been exceptionally patient until now, concerned and sympathetic. But she also was without half her garage, and had been for most of the year. Something needed to happen.

There’s a doozy of a catch 22 with depression: you feel shitty because you’re not doing anything that makes you feel good (being creative, hanging with friends, getting outside) but you can’t do anything that makes you feel good because you feel shitty. But I at least was feeling un-shitty enough to make myself do something and hope that would get things moving again.

The first feel-good came when I bought the first parts. I thought I’d start simple: new battery, change the oil and oil filter, change the fuel filter. I found a Volkswagen specialty shop not far from me that sold parts.

Walking into BRU Auto it was easy to forget what year it was. Decades-old Volkswagens filled the lot in various stages of repair. The wood paneled office didn’t look like it had changed much from the 70s. I fondly recalled the amazing old specialty shops and parts pickers I’d visited while working on the Honda. It made me happy that such places still existed in this modern age.

The following Sunday morning I arrived at my mom’s house with the battery, filters, and four quarts of 20w50 oil. I started by installing the new battery, and immediately worried that I was mixing up the negative and positive terminals and would blow up the garage (not quite, but still). My first action was met with crippling doubt, even though the connectors could only reach one terminal apiece with the battery in one possible position — it was essentially foolproof. I messaged my Uncle Chip a photo and he verified I did indeed have things situated correctly. Since I did not want the battery connected for any of the work I was about to do, I pulled it out again.

The oil change went exactly as anticipated. I got a kick out of the screw-in filter, and took care to fill it with oil and lubricate the seal.

 

The fuel situation scared me.

While the battery was attached I had turned on the electrical to check the gas level. The needle didn’t budge from ‘E.’ Uncle Chip theorized the fuel sender, a plastic float that sits on the surface of the gas and reports the level, might be stuck, so that didn’t necessarily mean there wasn’t gas in the tank. I really didn’t want to deal with a fuel line full of nearly decade-old gas, and didn’t trust that I’d be able to properly stop a flood in the garage, so I bought a cheap siphon kit. I thought I used it properly… maybe? I couldn’t really tell if I was getting a good seal to the hand pump. The hardcore way to siphon gas was just to suck it through a hose, right? Yeah, don’t do that, especially with gas that old. I got a lungful of rancid fumes, but no gas appeared.

Still anxious but not sure what else to try, I decided to give the fuel filter a try and hoped for the best. The rubber lines were fused to the ends of the filter, and I had to use a paint can opener to unstick the edges. About a teaspoon of stinky gas dribbled out of one end of the line. Relieved, I attached the new filter and marveled at my good fortune that there was no gas left in the tank. It must have evaporated, I assumed, not really knowing if that was a thing.

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The old filter was not such good news. It was almost completely gummed through with coagulated gas. If the filter was in such a state so too, likely, were the fuel lines, which were old, dried-out rubber anyhow. And the inside of the gas tank was possibly a mess, too — from what I’d read they weren’t sealed well and were prone to rust to begin with, and as gas sits it separates, the heavier water settling to the bottom. I didn’t want to run into problems down the road and regret not taking care of it at the beginning. Unsurprisingly, my simple start was mutating already.

My first day in the garage was a success, but I still didn’t feel up to writing. Over the next couple weeks the dark cloud lifted. Last week at the beach I wrote:

I’m standing in the breakers crying, because this is what I promised myself for six months, that I would feel okay again, that it wouldn’t last forever, that it never does.

It was hard to believe, like trying to remember a dream upon waking: having a vague idea of the feeling but the details slipping with each sleepy blink. But I believed it enough, and that’s all that matters.

And as good as this feels I know that this, too, shall pass.

But for now there’s the pull of the ocean on my legs and the blue of the sky and I feel okay.

I’ll take it.

So here, finally, is some blogging on the van for you to read, mama.

Sorry I took so long. But I’m glad to be back.

4 thoughts on “Dear Prudence

  1. Mom

    I too have tears in my eyes. It is SO hard to watch someone you love struggle, knowing there is not a thing you can do except to make sure they know how loved they are. I am thrilled you are working on your van again, but more thrilled that you are able to work on your van again. Here’s to many more Sunday work parties.

    Liked by 1 person

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