“I can build my own motorcycle.”

I suppose this is a departure from the original intent of the website… but at this point it’s a departure to post at all (last one was November 2018… oops) and it’s my damn page so there. I hope you’re keeping your chin up during the pandemic and you and yours are safe and sane. Hang in there, baby kitties. I love you. – george ellen 

Artwork by Yolanda Bustos ig @lollypop.hickey

San Diego, California. March, 2015. I’m at the DIY garage where I’ll soon move my ’76 CB550 for their monthly after-hours hangout. I’m there with my best friend “Michelle.” I’ve very recently broken up with my boyfriend of a little over a year, and it’s bad (it’ll get worse). I’m the skinniest I’ve ever been (I can’t eat, and I’ll get even skinnier when it comes time for the restraining order), and though I hate the cause I’m feeling the result, and I’m on a (temporary) high after finally ending the relationship. I’m single and ready to mingle… at least ready to talk shop and drink a couple beers.

Me & the Honda (then named ‘Geil’) in April when we moved into the shop

There aren’t a lot of people at this hangout, and Michelle and I are the only women. A guy around my age starts talking to the two of us and is hitting on me, hard. He’s exactly my type, down to his boozy overconfidence. Before long he demands my number. I explain I’m days out of a shitty relationship and I’m not ready (I’ve never subscribed to the notion that the best way to get over someone is to get under someone else). He doesn’t accept this. “I’ll take you out to dinner, anywhere you want, and then I’ll help you build your motorcycle.”

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Old vs. new fork oil

My ex was going to help me build my motorcycle. That had been the plan, anyway. I’d brought it to his house in bins, the engine belted into the passenger seat, and in the 6+ months it was there he helped me change the fork oil, mount tires, and buy a bunch of cheap parts I ultimately had to re-buy. I quickly learned that wrenching with him was a disaster that often ended with him throwing a fit (and tools) when he got frustrated. He refused to return the moto after the breakup, and only allowed my brother to collect it after my dad (who was the registered owner) called him. As I told my ex at the time — don’t fuck with my motorcycle. Holding my Honda hostage was the final nail in a coffin that was already six feet under.

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The rolling frame I moved into the shop

So I looked this dude square in the eye and told him: “I can build my own motorcycle, thanks.” And to my vague astonishment I realized I actually believed myself. I hadn’t the foggiest idea HOW I was going to build this motorcycle, but the last thing I wanted was another man involved. He finally conceded to giving me his number instead of taking mine, and I excused myself to the restroom, where I had a sudden, clanging awareness. I knew this guy.

“Did you ever shoot a couch?” I asked when I returned. I knew the answer immediately by the way his eyes narrowed and his features hardened. “Oh, you’re friends with Xxxxxx,” he sneered. I didn’t recognize him at first. He’d gained some weight and wasn’t as coiffed as he’d been when I’d heard the story years earlier. Back then he had a penchant for mod suits and shiny oxfords when I saw him every so often at shows or on the campus of the downtown community college. I wasn’t friends with his ex-girlfriend, but someone getting wasted and shooting their partner’s couch was the sort of gossip that made its quick way around a town as incestuous as San Diego.

His tone flat and cold, he told me that incident was an isolated one due to too much cocaine, which he no longer used (well, aside from last New Year’s Eve). Just to get confirmation (he was pretty cute), I asked the owners of the motorcycle shop what they thought of him. I was told he consistently got sloppy drunk at their events and then rode his motorcycle home, and that he had a dog who apparently so abhorred living with him it broke through a glass window to escape. What was this bizarre occurrence — it was like I was actually SEEING the red flags that were smacking me in the face. When I dropped off Michelle and told her I planned to throw away his number, she took it “in case I changed my mind.” I probably would have, in the past.

I’m glad I didn’t.

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2 thoughts on ““I can build my own motorcycle.”

  1. Jessica Parkhurst

    It is always a huge treat to get a glimpse of your incredible ability to share who you are in such an articulate and engaging way. More please!

    Like

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